Yara Blog


Get Out of My Way


Monday, July 1st, 2013  

Sirens were traditionally reserved for emergency vehicles: police vehicles in pursuit of criminals, ambulances conveying the sick to the emergency ward, the fire service on emergency runs, and, occasionally, senior state officials attending ceremonial functions. My

www.empowernetwork.com

www.empowernetwork.com

first encounter with the sound of a siren happened when I was a kid. There was a Wema Bank branch close to my father’s shop in our home town, and two or three times every week, there were these police vehicles that come to the bank to bring or take away money. The sirens on the vehicles were so loud that they could be heard when they were still hundreds of metres away. On hearing the siren, everybody usually scampered for safety because the policemen driving the vehicles had the habit of driving recklessly, without any regard for pedestrians’ safety or that of other road users.

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Nigeria: Outsourcing Justice


Saturday, June 29th, 2013  

“Arise oh compatriots”. That sentence has never seized to ignite in me a feeling of compassion, commitment, and unending dedication to the good and prosperity of my fatherland Nigeria. I am proudly Nigerian, and I will jump at any opportunity to let the world know. But, sincerely, there are times when I feel a rush of negative emotions like anger, pain, helplessness, and above all, shame, at the mere mention of the name ‘Nigeria’. I last experienced one of such moments on Tuesday, March 26, 2013 when I got the news of the conviction of Henry Okah by a South African court for acts of terrorism in Nigeria. That should ordinarily have been good tiding to my ears but the fact of Nigeria’s over-dependence on other countries in the fight against corruption and insecurity hit me like a blow. My scales-justicememory did an automatic flashback and the first stop was 2005. So, what about that year, you may ask, I’ll remind you.

In September 2005, Diepreye Alamieyeseigha, who had been elected Governor of Bayelsa State in May 1999 as a member of the ruling People’s Democratic Party (PDP) and re-elected in 2003, was detained in London on charges of money laundering. At the time of his arrest, the Metropolitan Police found about £1m in cash in his London home. Later, they found a total of £1.8m ($3.2m) in cash and bank accounts. The ultimate shock came when he presented himself as an object of national disgrace by jumping bail in December 2005 and escaping from the United Kingdom by disguising himself as a woman, though Alamieyeseigha denied this claim. On July 26, 2007, he pled guilty before a Nigerian court to six charges and was sentenced to two years in prison on each charge; however, because the sentences were set to run concurrently and the time was counted from the point of his arrest nearly two years before the sentences, his actual sentence was relatively short. On July 27, just hours after being taken to prison, he was released due to time already served. In my state of mental sojourn, the past is linked to the present, as we forward to March 12 2013 when President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan announced the grant of Presidential Pardon to Alamieyeseigha.

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No Paper, No Land, No Compensation.


Saturday, March 23rd, 2013  

Bild 5It was when I traveled home from school for the Christmas and New Year holidays that I noticed the changes that have taken place in my hometown. My family lives in Ijebu-Ode in Ogun State, and since the coming into power of the ACN government in 2011, there have been series of development projects across the state. The latest of such projects in Ijebu-Ode is the attempt of the government to expand the busiest road in the town known as Folagbade or Ibadan road. This road was built during the regime of Olabisi Onabanjo, the first Civilian Governor of Ogun State. It is a dual carriageway comprising of three lanes on each side. The present administration, in line with its urbanization drive, felt the need to further expand the road by widening it to four lanes on each side. Whether this project is desirable, considering the huge expense involved, the fact that funding for the project will come from loans, or that there was hardly any traffic build-up on the road to justify the expansion, is not the focus of this paper. That will be an issue for discussion in another forum.

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I DON’T WANT YOUR BABY


Monday, March 11th, 2013  

The first time I mentioned, to the hearing of my mother, that I would like to adopt a child when I was older, I was sharply rebuked. This reaction left me puzzled, for though I had heard someone saying before that Nigerians weren’t favorably disposed to adoption, I had waved it off because I couldn’t believe anyone would be opposed to what in my opinion was a benevolent gesture. So, I set out to find out the truth about Nigerians’ attitude towards adoption, and here’s what I discovered.

www.ellieswonder.blogspot.com

www.ellieswonder.blogspot.com

Having a child is one of the yardsticks by which the success of a marriage is measured; therefore infertility can be one of the strongest sources of pressure on a marriage. Sometimes, the woman (who mostly bears the brunt of the stigma of infertility in our society) is made to believe that without children, her place has not been secured in her husband’s home [Ginger’s blog]. Adoption is one of the options that can be used to manage the situation.

Upon research on the subject, my fears were confirmed. The Ebunoluwa orphanage confirmed that in Nigeria, customs and traditions have it that children who cannot be cared for by their parents are taken in by someone within their extended family, but the idea of taking in or adopting a child who is not somehow related to the family is highly uncommon.

In a survey by Ezugwu of 264 women who were having difficulty conceiving in South-Eastern Nigeria to determine their knowledge, attitude and practice of child adoption, it was shown that 183 of them [69.3%] were unwilling to adopt, while only 81[30%] were willing to consider adoption.

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DEVELOPMENT OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND THE LOSS OF INTER-PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS


Saturday, February 23rd, 2013  

www.wellsphere.com

www.wellsphere.com

The phrase `we are happier than our forefathers` has never been truer than it is today. Drawing from the tail-end of the 20th century to the rays of hope that brightened the 21st century, the planet called earth has enjoyed a significant improvement in culture, thanks to innovative technological developments by Microsoft, Apple, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, yahoo, Google, MySpace, Word press, and gadgets like the blackberry, Ipad, IPhones, amongst others, which have heralded the development of Information Technology. The works of Bill Gates, Larry Page, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Mark Cuban etc, have undoubtedly made life better for the lot of a significant percentage of the world’s population. Information is now better transmitted to a larger audience with minimal effort, surprisingly, at the speed of light. Reaching out to people across the poles via social media networks, reuniting lost friends and creating new acquaintances have become the norm of the day. Business transactions are now effected more quickly and with minimal risk. Online purchasing has opened a phase in the marketing world where buyers and sellers need not necessarily know or meet each other, and this by no means diminishes transactional efficiency. All these and many more are the beauties of the novel concept of Information Technology.

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I’M A GIRL, NOT A SLAVE; THE ENDLESS ROLES OF THE AFRICAN GIRL CHILD


Tuesday, February 19th, 2013  

I wake up in the morning and the first thought on my mind is the dishes left unwashed from last night’s dinner. Then I think of the fact

www.epm.org

www.epm.org

that the pump where we fetch our water from is two streets away. I’ve walked that path so many times I could do it blind-folded. And I mustn’t forget that my youngest brother must go to school sporting a properly ironed uniform and with his homework completely, if not completely correctly, done. And then, ‘oh my goodness!’, I’d fallen asleep researching materials for my term paper which is due in two days. Great! These, more often than not, are the waking thoughts of the average African girl child, at least the one lucky enough to be in school.

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The Mystery Behind a Handshake


Thursday, February 14th, 2013  

 

Ever since I was young, there was something about when a person stretched out their hand to join the hand of another person that fascinated me. For so long, I did not know why people ‘joined hands’, but I figured that it was just something you did when you met

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www.crystalgraphics.com

someone. I asked myself whether it was mandatory; I also wondered whether it would be rude to reject a handshake. After some study and research on the gist behind a simple handshake, I have discovered that there is more to it that meets the eye. Generally, some say that it is a custom, a mere convention carried out by people. Others say that there is science behind a single handshake, and those who read body language see a lot of importance in a handshake. Some secret societies, like the Masons, use them to identify apprentices and members of their society. Here is some insight on what I discovered.

Historically, the joining of hands can be traced back to Ancient Greece, as far back as the 5th century BC, where it was originally thought to symbolize peace, as both hands were not holding weapons. In modern times, it has been associated with good first impressions, especially in the business world. Ladies engage in handshakes in the work place as a sign of gender equality, while they may offer their fingers for a kiss in social gatherings.

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The Disparity between Reality and the Law: Marital Rape


Tuesday, February 12th, 2013  

www.fall2008rapeinfo.webs.com

www.fall2008rapeinfo.webs.com

It was the first mass of the new year, and the priest had decided to base the sermon on family values in accordance with the life of the

holy family. He preached about various habits of couples that ruined marriages, such as excessive drinking, gambling, adultery, abuse, etc. However, what really caught my attention was a question he addressed to the married couples about whether in their opinion a man could rape his wife. There was silence at first, but there came a resounding ‘yes’ from the congregation. According to these people, the answer was ‘yes’. It was indeed possible for a man to rape his wife. However, as a law student, I knew better. According to our laws, the answer should definitely not have been yes! Actually, it should have been a resounding ’no’.

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ENSURING WOMEN’S SAFETY: THE CASE OF SEXUAL VIOLENCE


Tuesday, January 29th, 2013  

According to Wikipedia, “sexual violence occurs throughout the world, although in most countries there has been little research

www.femonite.com

www.femonite.com

conducted on the problem. Due to the private nature of sexual violence, estimating the extent of the problem is difficult. Research in South Africa and Tanzania suggests that nearly one in four women may experience sexual violence by an intimate partner, and up to one-third of adolescent girls report their first sexual experience as being forced”.

Sexual violence is any sexual act that is perpetrated on a person against their will.  It encompasses a range of offences, including a completed non-consensual sex act (i.e. rape), an attempted non-consensual sex act, abusive sexual contact (i.e. unwanted touching), and non-contact sexual abuse (e.g. threatened sexual violence, exhibitionism, verbal sexual harassment).  The most common incident of sexual violence is rape.

 

 

 

 

 

 

(See  http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/sexualviolence/definitions.html)

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Kick Racism out of Football


Tuesday, January 15th, 2013  

tutkumuzfutbol.com

tutkumuzfutbol.com

 

It was February 2006 and the stage was set. Estadio de la Romareda, Zaragoza, Spain was the place, and there promised to be a very interesting football match in a clash between Barcelona FC and Real Zaragoza. What began as a typical football match took a grim turn when the crowd greeted one of the most decorated black players, Cameroonian Samuel Eto’o, with ape-like sounds. They overlooked all his worth, chanted ‘monkey’, and tossed banana peels. In response, Eto’o began the first open protest against racism, when he attempted to leave the pitch. Although he was restrained by his teammates, I asked myself, who in their right mind would sensibly discriminate between Eto’o and Beckham, Ronaldo, Shevchenko, Rooney and Drogba, Figo and Henry, Radebe and Maradona, Beckenbauer and Pele?

In an interview with CNN, Eto’o said “I was leaving the field and if it wasn’t for Rijkard, my teammates and the referee, I would have done it. In that moment, you start to think whether there is something wrong with being black, you know?”

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