Yara Blog


Nigeria: Outsourcing Justice


Saturday, June 29th, 2013  

“Arise oh compatriots”. That sentence has never seized to ignite in me a feeling of compassion, commitment, and unending dedication to the good and prosperity of my fatherland Nigeria. I am proudly Nigerian, and I will jump at any opportunity to let the world know. But, sincerely, there are times when I feel a rush of negative emotions like anger, pain, helplessness, and above all, shame, at the mere mention of the name ‘Nigeria’. I last experienced one of such moments on Tuesday, March 26, 2013 when I got the news of the conviction of Henry Okah by a South African court for acts of terrorism in Nigeria. That should ordinarily have been good tiding to my ears but the fact of Nigeria’s over-dependence on other countries in the fight against corruption and insecurity hit me like a blow. My scales-justicememory did an automatic flashback and the first stop was 2005. So, what about that year, you may ask, I’ll remind you.

In September 2005, Diepreye Alamieyeseigha, who had been elected Governor of Bayelsa State in May 1999 as a member of the ruling People’s Democratic Party (PDP) and re-elected in 2003, was detained in London on charges of money laundering. At the time of his arrest, the Metropolitan Police found about £1m in cash in his London home. Later, they found a total of £1.8m ($3.2m) in cash and bank accounts. The ultimate shock came when he presented himself as an object of national disgrace by jumping bail in December 2005 and escaping from the United Kingdom by disguising himself as a woman, though Alamieyeseigha denied this claim. On July 26, 2007, he pled guilty before a Nigerian court to six charges and was sentenced to two years in prison on each charge; however, because the sentences were set to run concurrently and the time was counted from the point of his arrest nearly two years before the sentences, his actual sentence was relatively short. On July 27, just hours after being taken to prison, he was released due to time already served. In my state of mental sojourn, the past is linked to the present, as we forward to March 12 2013 when President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan announced the grant of Presidential Pardon to Alamieyeseigha.

Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


That awkward moment


Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013  

godsrevolutiontoday.wordpress.com

godsrevolutiontoday.wordpress.com

#thatawkwardmoment is a trending topic the on social media networks, most especially twitter, these days. It is most amusing to see the things we, young people, come up with. Now, any time something ridiculous or embarrassing happens, my first impulse is to update my blackberry personal message or tell the world of twitter ‘what’s happening.’ So when I heard about the Farook Lawan saga, the first thing that came to mind was #thatawkwardmoment when Farook Lawan got caught stuffing bills into his cap.

I absorb with dismay the indignation of most people whenever they talk about the Farook Lawan saga. So intoxicating is their hate towards the man who abused his office so he could enrich himself Nigerian and even more intoxicating is their piety whenever they pass judgement on him. I won’t deny that I was once one of them.

Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,


NIGERIA AND THE PROBLEM OF ACCOUNTABILITY


Thursday, January 3rd, 2013  

www.ghanabusinessnews.com

www.ghanabusinessnews.com

It is true that every word has its own separate and distinct meaning; it is also true that a word may be redefined or its meaning reinvented by the accepted usage in a particular locality. This is why it is not surprising that most people would refer to all brands of noodles as ‘indomie’, regardless of the names of specific brands. However, I am concerned not with the different varieties of noodles, but with the word ‘accountability’ and the variance between the original meaning and the Nigerian customary or conventional definition.

The English word, ‘accountable’ simply means “to be called to be responsible for one’s actions; answerability”. Accountability is frequently referred to as an account-giving relationship existing between two parties. In governance, accountability is blame-worthiness and responsibility.

It is only conventional and customary that in a society, people in positions of authority or those in privileged positions are held accountable for their actions, in an effort to prevent chaos and disorder. These people, whether selected or elected, are expected to be answerable for their actions.

Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


The African State and the Effect of Its Sino-Relations.


Friday, April 27th, 2012  

Over the years, Africa, being home to majority of the developing countries of the world, has been and remains the continent where the most products – both original and sub-standard – are being dumped, making the African continent a dumping ground. Also, Africa, being home to mainly third world countries, has been and continues to be exploited by the developed countries of the world. Significant hazards in this regard include the signing of unfavourable trade agreements which are unhealthy to the African state, both economically and environmentally.  A vivid example of these exploits can be seen with the foreign oil companies in Nigeria, which employ methods of extraction of oil that pollute and destroy the surrounding land and water and the environment, making it hard to farm and fish. It is important to note that these oil companies do not do much to stop this pollution and they do not make any attempt to clean the environment or pay compensation to the affected communities for the destruction.

Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


  

Follow us!

Register and get updated whenever we post updates to the Yara Blog. You can also be part of the discussion by commenting on our posts. Join us now!

  • Register
  • Log in





     Tag Cloud

     Recent Posts


     Archives