Yara Blog


In Name or in Deed? – The Selectiveness of Nationality


Tuesday, June 11th, 2013  

http://www.economist.com/node/21542413

The shockingly heinous crime recently committed in broad day light on a London street by two black men is an unacceptable atrocity that has, however, generated an interesting dimension about our perceptions of nationality and citizenship.

The main perpetrator of the crime, a British citizen, Michael Adebolajo, was widely depicted in the British and international media as being a “British-born person of Nigerian descent”, resulting in vehement protests by the Nigerian community in the UK.   Their argument is that Adebolajo is a born and bred Brit – he was issued a birth certificate in the UK and holds a British passport; therefore, his name does not confirm his nationality.  These Nigerians in the diaspora are obviously worried about the negativity that can be easily generated if other British citizens associate such barbaric behavior and inhumane cruelty witnessed in this crime with other persons of Nigerian or African descent.

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THE ABSENCE OF THE DUTY TO CARE


Friday, April 12th, 2013  

Recently, an incident occurred in Alu community in Rivers state, Nigeria, where four young students were tortured for several hours and subsequently burnt alive in the presence of members of the community. This raised the question as to whether there is still any humane feeling in the members of our society. There is no doubt that the act was a display of barbarism as a result of the loss of values.

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No Paper, No Land, No Compensation.


Saturday, March 23rd, 2013  

Bild 5It was when I traveled home from school for the Christmas and New Year holidays that I noticed the changes that have taken place in my hometown. My family lives in Ijebu-Ode in Ogun State, and since the coming into power of the ACN government in 2011, there have been series of development projects across the state. The latest of such projects in Ijebu-Ode is the attempt of the government to expand the busiest road in the town known as Folagbade or Ibadan road. This road was built during the regime of Olabisi Onabanjo, the first Civilian Governor of Ogun State. It is a dual carriageway comprising of three lanes on each side. The present administration, in line with its urbanization drive, felt the need to further expand the road by widening it to four lanes on each side. Whether this project is desirable, considering the huge expense involved, the fact that funding for the project will come from loans, or that there was hardly any traffic build-up on the road to justify the expansion, is not the focus of this paper. That will be an issue for discussion in another forum.

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I DON’T WANT YOUR BABY


Monday, March 11th, 2013  

The first time I mentioned, to the hearing of my mother, that I would like to adopt a child when I was older, I was sharply rebuked. This reaction left me puzzled, for though I had heard someone saying before that Nigerians weren’t favorably disposed to adoption, I had waved it off because I couldn’t believe anyone would be opposed to what in my opinion was a benevolent gesture. So, I set out to find out the truth about Nigerians’ attitude towards adoption, and here’s what I discovered.

www.ellieswonder.blogspot.com

www.ellieswonder.blogspot.com

Having a child is one of the yardsticks by which the success of a marriage is measured; therefore infertility can be one of the strongest sources of pressure on a marriage. Sometimes, the woman (who mostly bears the brunt of the stigma of infertility in our society) is made to believe that without children, her place has not been secured in her husband’s home [Ginger’s blog]. Adoption is one of the options that can be used to manage the situation.

Upon research on the subject, my fears were confirmed. The Ebunoluwa orphanage confirmed that in Nigeria, customs and traditions have it that children who cannot be cared for by their parents are taken in by someone within their extended family, but the idea of taking in or adopting a child who is not somehow related to the family is highly uncommon.

In a survey by Ezugwu of 264 women who were having difficulty conceiving in South-Eastern Nigeria to determine their knowledge, attitude and practice of child adoption, it was shown that 183 of them [69.3%] were unwilling to adopt, while only 81[30%] were willing to consider adoption.

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DEVELOPMENT OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND THE LOSS OF INTER-PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS


Saturday, February 23rd, 2013  

www.wellsphere.com

www.wellsphere.com

The phrase `we are happier than our forefathers` has never been truer than it is today. Drawing from the tail-end of the 20th century to the rays of hope that brightened the 21st century, the planet called earth has enjoyed a significant improvement in culture, thanks to innovative technological developments by Microsoft, Apple, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, yahoo, Google, MySpace, Word press, and gadgets like the blackberry, Ipad, IPhones, amongst others, which have heralded the development of Information Technology. The works of Bill Gates, Larry Page, Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Mark Cuban etc, have undoubtedly made life better for the lot of a significant percentage of the world’s population. Information is now better transmitted to a larger audience with minimal effort, surprisingly, at the speed of light. Reaching out to people across the poles via social media networks, reuniting lost friends and creating new acquaintances have become the norm of the day. Business transactions are now effected more quickly and with minimal risk. Online purchasing has opened a phase in the marketing world where buyers and sellers need not necessarily know or meet each other, and this by no means diminishes transactional efficiency. All these and many more are the beauties of the novel concept of Information Technology.

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I’M A GIRL, NOT A SLAVE; THE ENDLESS ROLES OF THE AFRICAN GIRL CHILD


Tuesday, February 19th, 2013  

I wake up in the morning and the first thought on my mind is the dishes left unwashed from last night’s dinner. Then I think of the fact

www.epm.org

www.epm.org

that the pump where we fetch our water from is two streets away. I’ve walked that path so many times I could do it blind-folded. And I mustn’t forget that my youngest brother must go to school sporting a properly ironed uniform and with his homework completely, if not completely correctly, done. And then, ‘oh my goodness!’, I’d fallen asleep researching materials for my term paper which is due in two days. Great! These, more often than not, are the waking thoughts of the average African girl child, at least the one lucky enough to be in school.

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The Mystery Behind a Handshake


Thursday, February 14th, 2013  

 

Ever since I was young, there was something about when a person stretched out their hand to join the hand of another person that fascinated me. For so long, I did not know why people ‘joined hands’, but I figured that it was just something you did when you met

www.crystalgraphics.com

www.crystalgraphics.com

someone. I asked myself whether it was mandatory; I also wondered whether it would be rude to reject a handshake. After some study and research on the gist behind a simple handshake, I have discovered that there is more to it that meets the eye. Generally, some say that it is a custom, a mere convention carried out by people. Others say that there is science behind a single handshake, and those who read body language see a lot of importance in a handshake. Some secret societies, like the Masons, use them to identify apprentices and members of their society. Here is some insight on what I discovered.

Historically, the joining of hands can be traced back to Ancient Greece, as far back as the 5th century BC, where it was originally thought to symbolize peace, as both hands were not holding weapons. In modern times, it has been associated with good first impressions, especially in the business world. Ladies engage in handshakes in the work place as a sign of gender equality, while they may offer their fingers for a kiss in social gatherings.

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The Disparity between Reality and the Law: Marital Rape


Tuesday, February 12th, 2013  

www.fall2008rapeinfo.webs.com

www.fall2008rapeinfo.webs.com

It was the first mass of the new year, and the priest had decided to base the sermon on family values in accordance with the life of the

holy family. He preached about various habits of couples that ruined marriages, such as excessive drinking, gambling, adultery, abuse, etc. However, what really caught my attention was a question he addressed to the married couples about whether in their opinion a man could rape his wife. There was silence at first, but there came a resounding ‘yes’ from the congregation. According to these people, the answer was ‘yes’. It was indeed possible for a man to rape his wife. However, as a law student, I knew better. According to our laws, the answer should definitely not have been yes! Actually, it should have been a resounding ’no’.

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That awkward moment


Wednesday, January 23rd, 2013  

godsrevolutiontoday.wordpress.com

godsrevolutiontoday.wordpress.com

#thatawkwardmoment is a trending topic the on social media networks, most especially twitter, these days. It is most amusing to see the things we, young people, come up with. Now, any time something ridiculous or embarrassing happens, my first impulse is to update my blackberry personal message or tell the world of twitter ‘what’s happening.’ So when I heard about the Farook Lawan saga, the first thing that came to mind was #thatawkwardmoment when Farook Lawan got caught stuffing bills into his cap.

I absorb with dismay the indignation of most people whenever they talk about the Farook Lawan saga. So intoxicating is their hate towards the man who abused his office so he could enrich himself Nigerian and even more intoxicating is their piety whenever they pass judgement on him. I won’t deny that I was once one of them.

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When the Law has No Power: The “Corrective Rape” Situation in South Africa


Thursday, January 10th, 2013  

www,icr.org

www,icr.org

South Africa has long been celebrated as the “Rainbow nation” because of her plurality and diversity. And, although South Africa was the first country to grant constitutional recognition to the protection of the rights of homosexuals, there appears to be a wide gulf between law and practice in this “progressive” state.

In recent times, there have been several cases of what has been termed “corrective rape” or “curative rape”. This refers to a situation where women who have sex with women (WSW) are sexually and brutally ‘punished’ by men for being gay and violating traditional gender presentation. Not long ago, on May 4, 2011, a 13 year old girl was raped near Pretoria, South Africa, because of her sexual orientation.  According to the young victim, her assailant told her he was “curing” her of lesbianism. This is just one of the many attacks on the dignity and bodily integrity of lesbian women. It is worth noting that such incidents of violence against WSW are not peculiar to South Africa but have also occurred in other African states like Zimbabwe and Uganda, as well as in Jamaica.

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